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This video summarizes the four areas of ASL Presents’ curriculum services: ASL as first language from birth to high school, learning ASL as a second language, interpreter preparation and ASL teacher preparation.

 
   

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  Coming Up   Signing Naturally   ellasflashlight  
 
 
 
     
 

ASL Presents provides curriculum services in four areas:

  1. Educational curriculum (from birth to the 12th grade) for Deaf children who acquire ASL as their first language, focusing on fluency, literacy and literary development in ASL: ASL Presents can work with reviews of existing or developing curricula to ensure that age-appropriate benchmarks are achieved through lessons and activities.

  2. ASL curriculum for high school and college students learning ASL as a second language: ASL Presents can help establish appropriate objectives and lessons for an ASL program’s overall curriculum, such as ASL 1-4, fingerspelling, ASL numbers, and so forth. ASL Presents can also work in refining or developing course outlines for college-level curriculum committee for approval and/or accreditation, preparing or providing feedback, setting up ASL/Deaf culture course objectives, prerequisites, required materials, benchmarks and assessment.

  3. Interpreter preparation/training: For those who are fluent in both ASL and English and want to develop interpreting competencies, ASL Presents can provide resources and consultation on program expectations and qualities. ASL Presents also works with interpreter preparation programs in making sure their curricula provide student readiness for interpreter certification and degrees.

  4. ASL instructor training: ASL Presents has experience training ASL instructors through presentations, workshops, and curriculum development to become more qualified instructors. Key aspects of teaching ASL involve having the right attitude towards ASL and Deaf culture, understanding students’ experiences in learning either first or second languages, ASL-teaching philosophies, and lesson-planning ingredients. ASL teachers need to be competent in several areas before they can receive teaching credentials and/or begin quality teaching.
 
     
 
Coming Up   Signing Naturally   ellasflashlight